Mainstream Media

The Enemy Within


By TLW


Can Anders Breivik, mastermind of the Norway attacks, be compared to his militant contemporaries in Pakistan?



On the afternoon of Friday 22 July 2011, a car bomb went off in the Regjeringskvartalat (the Government Quarter) of Oslo, the capital of Norway. Buildings housing government buildings, and the exterior of the Prime Minister of Norway's office, were damaged. The attack killed 8 and hurt many others, 10 of whom were critically injured. Then, just an hour and a half later, in a copy of Al Qaeda's bomb-and-gun method of attack, the killer went ashore on a political youth camp on a small island called Utøya, on Lake Tyrifjorden. There were 600 young people in that camp and the killer, Anders Behring Breivik, 32, went ashore dressed in police uniform, summoned the people around him under the pretext of disseminating police information relating to the Oslo bombs that had exploded hours before, and then began to shoot. He shot everybody until the police managed to reach the island by water an hour and a half later. By that time Brevik had killed 68 people (mostly youths) and injured 66 in Utøya, and upon the approach of the police he surrendered.
Thomas Heghammer, a terror expert from the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, said that the manifesto bears a resemblance to those of Osama Bin Ladin, although from the standpoint of a Christian

This psychopathic behaviour was compounded by the discovery of Brevik's manifesto in which he lays out his views on Islam, its supposed rise in Europe and his violent methods of countering it. But his words, however lucid and logically laid out, and despite lacking real empirical evidence, are drowned out by his clearly psychopathic actions.

Indeed, he has been portrayed as Europe's Timothy McVeigh, the man who killed 168 people in the Oklahoma City Bombing and set back the American militia movement, which saw a serious crackdown on it across the United States. In this way Anders Brevik was part of a new post-9/11 wave of far-right extremists, a good example of which is the English Defence League (EDL) which attacks European Muslims and Islam on cultural grounds to mobilise its followers. Unlike the more race-based hatred of the British National Party, which attacked Muslims and immigrants from the white supremacist position, Anders Brevik's ideology and that of the English Defence League attack Islam and Muslims and their liberal friends in the West on the grounds that Islam's presence in Europe needs to be confronted because any acceptance of it is an affront to traditional Western values of democracy, freedom, women's rights and a "cultural" Christianity. Anders Brevik himself came to London in 2002, as he outlined in his manifesto, and that is where he likely picked up his ideas about a simultaneously anti-liberal, anti-Islam campaign. He even attended an EDL demonstration later in 2010 as noted by The Guardian.
 

Anders Brevik has a college education, with a degree in Business Administration. Despite his high qualification, this man acted on sociopathic tendencies and his deranged ideology to attack and kill 76 people whilst injuring 96 others with guns and bombs.

In Norway, a man with a degree in Business Administration had to be a lone and brutally efficient gunman, carrying out his own massacre. But in Pakistan a man with a plan like that of Anders Brevik (a desi Muslim living inside Pakistan, with his middling qualifications and middle class background) would have found no dearth of terrorist organisations willing to accept him. He would easily have been accommodated into some third-tier position in Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, Sipah-e-Sahaba or the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan. There would be no lack of experienced gunmen for this trained manager of men to command. That is the difference between Norway and Pakistan. Whereas their right-wing extremists have to plot, fund and plan on the fringes of their society, slipping across borders for ideological support, in Pakistan if one has mad plans to exterminate an entire segment of the population one will find many takers and followers in a jiffy.
In Norway, a man with a degree in Business Administration had to be a lone and brutally efficient gunman, carrying out his own massacre. But in Pakistan a man with a plan like that of Anders Brevik would have found no dearth of terrorist organisations willing to accept him

In his manifesto, Anders Brevik made a departure from the ideas of the Norwegian right-wing's pre-9/11 attitude, which venerated paganism, held up the Vikings and decried the "softening" influence Christianity had on Norwegian society. This complaint about Norway becoming less militaristic and more pacifist could be found in the 90s among the followers of the Norwegian Black Metal scene, where openly racist metallists like Euronymous of Mayhem and Varg Vikernes of Burzum spouted theories of neo-paganism and racial purity. However, this was no gimmick or joke, as Varg Vikernes ended up killing Euronymous in a fight and serving a prison sentence. Another member of Mayhem had a bloody end: drummer Per "Dead" Ohlin committed suicide with a shotgun two years before bandmate Euronymous's death. Compare these outcomes with what has happened to two of Pakistan's musical icons of the 90s who succumbed to conservative ideologies: Junaid Jamshaid of Vital Sings forswore music to become a Tableeghi, while Ali Azmat of Junoon became a mouthpiece for conspiracy theories peddled by the military establishment of Pakistan. These are cultural reflections of ideological misanthropies, to be sure. But the difference is that the politically powerful of Norway made sure that it remained on the fringes of their society. Their media, parliament and legal system have so far prevented the mania of the far-right from shaping public opinion.
 

This is why Anders Brevik had to go to London to find support for his Crusades-oriented "revolt" against his own culture's laxity. Brevik harked back to the Knights Templars' who fought the Muslims in the Crusades, and not the vikings of pre-Christian Norway. This was a sort of Christian reflection of Al Qaeda's call for jihad against Westerners in the Middle East. The Daily Mail quoted Thomas Heghammer, a terror expert from the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, who said that the manifesto bears a resemblance to those of Osama Bin Ladin, although from the standpoint of a Christian.
 

In the end, like Osama Bin Ladin, Anders Brevik seems to have killed more of his own co-religionists and fellow race-members, than any of his (perceived) enemy targets. According to his own chauvinistic ideology, he had found his co-religionists and native Norwegians not sufficiently adhering to their own culture and religion. Rather like Al-Qaeda and its friends in Pakistan, isn't it?
 

 
On the afternoon of Friday 22 July 2011, a car bomb went off in the Regjeringskvartalat (the Government Quarter) of Oslo, the capital of Norway. Buildings housing government buildings, and the exterior of the Prime Minister of Norway's office, were damaged. The attack killed 8 and hurt many others, 10 of whom were critically injured. Then, just an hour and a half later, in a copy of Al Qaeda's bomb-and-gun method of attack, the killer went ashore on a political youth camp on a small island called Ut�ya, on Lake Tyrifjorden. There were 600 young people in that camp and the killer, Anders Behring Breivik, 32, went ashore dressed in police uniform, summoned the people around him under the pretext of disseminating police information relating to the Oslo bombs that had exploded hours before, and then began to shoot. He shot everybody until the police managed to reach the island by water an hour and a half later. By that time Brevik had killed 68 people (mostly youths) and injured 66 in Utoya, and upon the approach of the police he surrendered.

Thomas Heghammer, a terror expert from the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, said that the manifesto bears a resemblance to those of Osama Bin Ladin, although from the standpoint of a Christian

This psychopathic behaviour was compounded by the discovery of Brevik's manifesto in which he lays out his views on Islam, its supposed rise in Europe and his violent methods of countering it. But his words, however lucid and logically laid out, and despite lacking real empirical evidence, are drowned out by his clearly psychopathic actions.

Indeed, he has been portrayed as Europe's Timothy McVeigh, the man who killed 168 people in the Oklahoma City Bombing and set back the American militia movement, which saw a serious crackdown on it across the United States. In this way Anders Brevik was part of a new post-9/11 wave of far-right extremists, a good example of which is the English Defence League (EDL) which attacks European Muslims and Islam on cultural grounds to mobilise its followers. Unlike the more race-based hatred of the British National Party, which attacked Muslims and immigrants from the white supremacist position, Anders Brevik's ideology and that of the English Defence League attack Islam and Muslims and their liberal friends in the West on the grounds that Islam's presence in Europe needs to be confronted because any acceptance of it is an affront to traditional Western values of democracy, freedom, women's rights and a "cultural" Christianity. Anders Brevik himself came to London in 2002, as he outlined in his manifesto, and that is where he likely picked up his ideas about a simultaneously anti-liberal, anti-Islam campaign. He even attended an EDL demonstration later in 2010 as noted by The Guardian.

Anders Brevik has a college education, with a degree in Business Administration. Despite his high qualification, this man acted on sociopathic tendencies and his deranged ideology to attack and kill 76 people whilst injuring 96 others with guns and bombs.
Article Box

Article Box
In Norway, a man with a degree in Business Administration had to be a lone and brutally efficient gunman, carrying out his own massacre. But in Pakistan a man with a plan like that of Anders Brevik (a desi Muslim living inside Pakistan, with his middling qualifications and middle class background) would have found no dearth of terrorist organisations willing to accept him. He would easily have been accommodated into some third-tier position in Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, Sipah-e-Sahaba or the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan. There would be no lack of experienced gunmen for this trained manager of men to command. That is the difference between Norway and Pakistan. Whereas their right-wing extremists have to plot, fund and plan on the fringes of their society, slipping across borders for ideological support, in Pakistan if one has mad plans to exterminate an entire segment of the population one will find many takers and followers in a jiffy.

In Norway, a man with a degree in Business Administration had to be a lone and brutally efficient gunman, carrying out his own massacre. But in Pakistan a man with a plan like that of Anders Brevik would have found no dearth of terrorist organisations willing to accept him

In his manifesto, Anders Brevik made a departure from the ideas of the Norwegian right-wing's pre-9/11 attitude, which venerated paganism, held up the Vikings and decried the "softening" influence Christianity had on Norwegian society. This complaint about Norway becoming less militaristic and more pacifist could be found in the 90s among the followers of the Norwegian Black Metal scene, where openly racist metallists like Euronymous of Mayhem and Varg Vikernes of Burzum spouted theories of neo-paganism and racial purity. However, this was no gimmick or joke, as Varg Vikernes ended up killing Euronymous in a fight and serving a prison sentence. Another member of Mayhem had a bloody end: drummer Per "Dead" Ohlin committed suicide with a shotgun two years before bandmate Euronymous's death. Compare these outcomes with what has happened to two of Pakistan's musical icons of the 90s who succumbed to conservative ideologies: Junaid Jamshaid of Vital Sings forswore music to become a Tableeghi, while Ali Azmat of Junoon became a mouthpiece for conspiracy theories peddled by the military establishment of Pakistan. These are cultural reflections of ideological misanthropies, to be sure. But the difference is that the politically powerful of Norway made sure that it remained on the fringes of their society. Their media, parliament and legal system have so far prevented the mania of the far-right from shaping public opinion.

This is why Anders Brevik had to go to London to find support for his Crusades-oriented "revolt" against his own culture's laxity. Brevik harked back to the Knights Templars' who fought the Muslims in the Crusades, and not the vikings of pre-Christian Norway. This was a sort of Christian reflection of Al Qaeda's call for jihad against Westerners in the Middle East. The Daily Mail quoted Thomas Heghammer, a terror expert from the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, who said that the manifesto bears a resemblance to those of Osama Bin Ladin, although from the standpoint of a Christian.

In the end, like Osama Bin Ladin, Anders Brevik seems to have killed more of his own co-religionists and fellow race-members, than any of his (perceived) enemy targets. According to his own chauvinistic ideology, he had found his co-religionists and native Norwegians not sufficiently adhering to their own culture and religion. Rather like Al-Qaeda and its friends in Pakistan, isn't it?

TLW blogs at http://theselongwars.blogspot.com and can be followed on http://twitter.com/theselongwars
 

Comments (3 comments)

- See more at: http://www.thefridaytimes.com/beta2/tft/article.php?issue=20110805&page=23#sthash.MOTy0LwA.dpuf
 
On the afternoon of Friday 22 July 2011, a car bomb went off in the Regjeringskvartalat (the Government Quarter) of Oslo, the capital of Norway. Buildings housing government buildings, and the exterior of the Prime Minister of Norway's office, were damaged. The attack killed 8 and hurt many others, 10 of whom were critically injured. Then, just an hour and a half later, in a copy of Al Qaeda's bomb-and-gun method of attack, the killer went ashore on a political youth camp on a small island called Ut�ya, on Lake Tyrifjorden. There were 600 young people in that camp and the killer, Anders Behring Breivik, 32, went ashore dressed in police uniform, summoned the people around him under the pretext of disseminating police information relating to the Oslo bombs that had exploded hours before, and then began to shoot. He shot everybody until the police managed to reach the island by water an hour and a half later. By that time Brevik had killed 68 people (mostly youths) and injured 66 in Utoya, and upon the approach of the police he surrendered.

Thomas Heghammer, a terror expert from the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, said that the manifesto bears a resemblance to those of Osama Bin Ladin, although from the standpoint of a Christian

This psychopathic behaviour was compounded by the discovery of Brevik's manifesto in which he lays out his views on Islam, its supposed rise in Europe and his violent methods of countering it. But his words, however lucid and logically laid out, and despite lacking real empirical evidence, are drowned out by his clearly psychopathic actions.

Indeed, he has been portrayed as Europe's Timothy McVeigh, the man who killed 168 people in the Oklahoma City Bombing and set back the American militia movement, which saw a serious crackdown on it across the United States. In this way Anders Brevik was part of a new post-9/11 wave of far-right extremists, a good example of which is the English Defence League (EDL) which attacks European Muslims and Islam on cultural grounds to mobilise its followers. Unlike the more race-based hatred of the British National Party, which attacked Muslims and immigrants from the white supremacist position, Anders Brevik's ideology and that of the English Defence League attack Islam and Muslims and their liberal friends in the West on the grounds that Islam's presence in Europe needs to be confronted because any acceptance of it is an affront to traditional Western values of democracy, freedom, women's rights and a "cultural" Christianity. Anders Brevik himself came to London in 2002, as he outlined in his manifesto, and that is where he likely picked up his ideas about a simultaneously anti-liberal, anti-Islam campaign. He even attended an EDL demonstration later in 2010 as noted by The Guardian.

Anders Brevik has a college education, with a degree in Business Administration. Despite his high qualification, this man acted on sociopathic tendencies and his deranged ideology to attack and kill 76 people whilst injuring 96 others with guns and bombs.
Article Box

Article Box
In Norway, a man with a degree in Business Administration had to be a lone and brutally efficient gunman, carrying out his own massacre. But in Pakistan a man with a plan like that of Anders Brevik (a desi Muslim living inside Pakistan, with his middling qualifications and middle class background) would have found no dearth of terrorist organisations willing to accept him. He would easily have been accommodated into some third-tier position in Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, Sipah-e-Sahaba or the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan. There would be no lack of experienced gunmen for this trained manager of men to command. That is the difference between Norway and Pakistan. Whereas their right-wing extremists have to plot, fund and plan on the fringes of their society, slipping across borders for ideological support, in Pakistan if one has mad plans to exterminate an entire segment of the population one will find many takers and followers in a jiffy.

In Norway, a man with a degree in Business Administration had to be a lone and brutally efficient gunman, carrying out his own massacre. But in Pakistan a man with a plan like that of Anders Brevik would have found no dearth of terrorist organisations willing to accept him

In his manifesto, Anders Brevik made a departure from the ideas of the Norwegian right-wing's pre-9/11 attitude, which venerated paganism, held up the Vikings and decried the "softening" influence Christianity had on Norwegian society. This complaint about Norway becoming less militaristic and more pacifist could be found in the 90s among the followers of the Norwegian Black Metal scene, where openly racist metallists like Euronymous of Mayhem and Varg Vikernes of Burzum spouted theories of neo-paganism and racial purity. However, this was no gimmick or joke, as Varg Vikernes ended up killing Euronymous in a fight and serving a prison sentence. Another member of Mayhem had a bloody end: drummer Per "Dead" Ohlin committed suicide with a shotgun two years before bandmate Euronymous's death. Compare these outcomes with what has happened to two of Pakistan's musical icons of the 90s who succumbed to conservative ideologies: Junaid Jamshaid of Vital Sings forswore music to become a Tableeghi, while Ali Azmat of Junoon became a mouthpiece for conspiracy theories peddled by the military establishment of Pakistan. These are cultural reflections of ideological misanthropies, to be sure. But the difference is that the politically powerful of Norway made sure that it remained on the fringes of their society. Their media, parliament and legal system have so far prevented the mania of the far-right from shaping public opinion.

This is why Anders Brevik had to go to London to find support for his Crusades-oriented "revolt" against his own culture's laxity. Brevik harked back to the Knights Templars' who fought the Muslims in the Crusades, and not the vikings of pre-Christian Norway. This was a sort of Christian reflection of Al Qaeda's call for jihad against Westerners in the Middle East. The Daily Mail quoted Thomas Heghammer, a terror expert from the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, who said that the manifesto bears a resemblance to those of Osama Bin Ladin, although from the standpoint of a Christian.

In the end, like Osama Bin Ladin, Anders Brevik seems to have killed more of his own co-religionists and fellow race-members, than any of his (perceived) enemy targets. According to his own chauvinistic ideology, he had found his co-religionists and native Norwegians not sufficiently adhering to their own culture and religion. Rather like Al-Qaeda and its friends in Pakistan, isn't it?

TLW blogs at http://theselongwars.blogspot.com and can be followed on http://twitter.com/theselongwars
 

Comments (3 comments)

- See more at: http://www.thefridaytimes.com/beta2/tft/article.php?issue=20110805&page=23#sthash.MOTy0LwA.dpuf

The enemy within
 17 0
 
On the afternoon of Friday 22 July 2011, a car bomb went off in the Regjeringskvartalat (the Government Quarter) of Oslo, the capital of Norway. Buildings housing government buildings, and the exterior of the Prime Minister of Norway's office, were damaged. The attack killed 8 and hurt many others, 10 of whom were critically injured. Then, just an hour and a half later, in a copy of Al Qaeda's bomb-and-gun method of attack, the killer went ashore on a political youth camp on a small island called Ut�ya, on Lake Tyrifjorden. There were 600 young people in that camp and the killer, Anders Behring Breivik, 32, went ashore dressed in police uniform, summoned the people around him under the pretext of disseminating police information relating to the Oslo bombs that had exploded hours before, and then began to shoot. He shot everybody until the police managed to reach the island by water an hour and a half later. By that time Brevik had killed 68 people (mostly youths) and injured 66 in Utoya, and upon the approach of the police he surrendered.

Thomas Heghammer, a terror expert from the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, said that the manifesto bears a resemblance to those of Osama Bin Ladin, although from the standpoint of a Christian

This psychopathic behaviour was compounded by the discovery of Brevik's manifesto in which he lays out his views on Islam, its supposed rise in Europe and his violent methods of countering it. But his words, however lucid and logically laid out, and despite lacking real empirical evidence, are drowned out by his clearly psychopathic actions.

Indeed, he has been portrayed as Europe's Timothy McVeigh, the man who killed 168 people in the Oklahoma City Bombing and set back the American militia movement, which saw a serious crackdown on it across the United States. In this way Anders Brevik was part of a new post-9/11 wave of far-right extremists, a good example of which is the English Defence League (EDL) which attacks European Muslims and Islam on cultural grounds to mobilise its followers. Unlike the more race-based hatred of the British National Party, which attacked Muslims and immigrants from the white supremacist position, Anders Brevik's ideology and that of the English Defence League attack Islam and Muslims and their liberal friends in the West on the grounds that Islam's presence in Europe needs to be confronted because any acceptance of it is an affront to traditional Western values of democracy, freedom, women's rights and a "cultural" Christianity. Anders Brevik himself came to London in 2002, as he outlined in his manifesto, and that is where he likely picked up his ideas about a simultaneously anti-liberal, anti-Islam campaign. He even attended an EDL demonstration later in 2010 as noted by The Guardian.

Anders Brevik has a college education, with a degree in Business Administration. Despite his high qualification, this man acted on sociopathic tendencies and his deranged ideology to attack and kill 76 people whilst injuring 96 others with guns and bombs.
Article Box

Article Box
In Norway, a man with a degree in Business Administration had to be a lone and brutally efficient gunman, carrying out his own massacre. But in Pakistan a man with a plan like that of Anders Brevik (a desi Muslim living inside Pakistan, with his middling qualifications and middle class background) would have found no dearth of terrorist organisations willing to accept him. He would easily have been accommodated into some third-tier position in Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, Sipah-e-Sahaba or the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan. There would be no lack of experienced gunmen for this trained manager of men to command. That is the difference between Norway and Pakistan. Whereas their right-wing extremists have to plot, fund and plan on the fringes of their society, slipping across borders for ideological support, in Pakistan if one has mad plans to exterminate an entire segment of the population one will find many takers and followers in a jiffy.

In Norway, a man with a degree in Business Administration had to be a lone and brutally efficient gunman, carrying out his own massacre. But in Pakistan a man with a plan like that of Anders Brevik would have found no dearth of terrorist organisations willing to accept him

In his manifesto, Anders Brevik made a departure from the ideas of the Norwegian right-wing's pre-9/11 attitude, which venerated paganism, held up the Vikings and decried the "softening" influence Christianity had on Norwegian society. This complaint about Norway becoming less militaristic and more pacifist could be found in the 90s among the followers of the Norwegian Black Metal scene, where openly racist metallists like Euronymous of Mayhem and Varg Vikernes of Burzum spouted theories of neo-paganism and racial purity. However, this was no gimmick or joke, as Varg Vikernes ended up killing Euronymous in a fight and serving a prison sentence. Another member of Mayhem had a bloody end: drummer Per "Dead" Ohlin committed suicide with a shotgun two years before bandmate Euronymous's death. Compare these outcomes with what has happened to two of Pakistan's musical icons of the 90s who succumbed to conservative ideologies: Junaid Jamshaid of Vital Sings forswore music to become a Tableeghi, while Ali Azmat of Junoon became a mouthpiece for conspiracy theories peddled by the military establishment of Pakistan. These are cultural reflections of ideological misanthropies, to be sure. But the difference is that the politically powerful of Norway made sure that it remained on the fringes of their society. Their media, parliament and legal system have so far prevented the mania of the far-right from shaping public opinion.

This is why Anders Brevik had to go to London to find support for his Crusades-oriented "revolt" against his own culture's laxity. Brevik harked back to the Knights Templars' who fought the Muslims in the Crusades, and not the vikings of pre-Christian Norway. This was a sort of Christian reflection of Al Qaeda's call for jihad against Westerners in the Middle East. The Daily Mail quoted Thomas Heghammer, a terror expert from the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, who said that the manifesto bears a resemblance to those of Osama Bin Ladin, although from the standpoint of a Christian.

In the end, like Osama Bin Ladin, Anders Brevik seems to have killed more of his own co-religionists and fellow race-members, than any of his (perceived) enemy targets. According to his own chauvinistic ideology, he had found his co-religionists and native Norwegians not sufficiently adhering to their own culture and religion. Rather like Al-Qaeda and its friends in Pakistan, isn't it?

TLW blogs at http://theselongwars.blogspot.com and can be followed on http://twitter.com/theselongwars
 

Comments (3 comments)

Furthermore

- See more at: http://www.thefridaytimes.com/beta2/tft/article.php?issue=20110805&page=23#sthash.FlDb7IxV.dpuf

The enemy within
 17 0
 
On the afternoon of Friday 22 July 2011, a car bomb went off in the Regjeringskvartalat (the Government Quarter) of Oslo, the capital of Norway. Buildings housing government buildings, and the exterior of the Prime Minister of Norway's office, were damaged. The attack killed 8 and hurt many others, 10 of whom were critically injured. Then, just an hour and a half later, in a copy of Al Qaeda's bomb-and-gun method of attack, the killer went ashore on a political youth camp on a small island called Ut�ya, on Lake Tyrifjorden. There were 600 young people in that camp and the killer, Anders Behring Breivik, 32, went ashore dressed in police uniform, summoned the people around him under the pretext of disseminating police information relating to the Oslo bombs that had exploded hours before, and then began to shoot. He shot everybody until the police managed to reach the island by water an hour and a half later. By that time Brevik had killed 68 people (mostly youths) and injured 66 in Utoya, and upon the approach of the police he surrendered.

Thomas Heghammer, a terror expert from the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, said that the manifesto bears a resemblance to those of Osama Bin Ladin, although from the standpoint of a Christian

This psychopathic behaviour was compounded by the discovery of Brevik's manifesto in which he lays out his views on Islam, its supposed rise in Europe and his violent methods of countering it. But his words, however lucid and logically laid out, and despite lacking real empirical evidence, are drowned out by his clearly psychopathic actions.

Indeed, he has been portrayed as Europe's Timothy McVeigh, the man who killed 168 people in the Oklahoma City Bombing and set back the American militia movement, which saw a serious crackdown on it across the United States. In this way Anders Brevik was part of a new post-9/11 wave of far-right extremists, a good example of which is the English Defence League (EDL) which attacks European Muslims and Islam on cultural grounds to mobilise its followers. Unlike the more race-based hatred of the British National Party, which attacked Muslims and immigrants from the white supremacist position, Anders Brevik's ideology and that of the English Defence League attack Islam and Muslims and their liberal friends in the West on the grounds that Islam's presence in Europe needs to be confronted because any acceptance of it is an affront to traditional Western values of democracy, freedom, women's rights and a "cultural" Christianity. Anders Brevik himself came to London in 2002, as he outlined in his manifesto, and that is where he likely picked up his ideas about a simultaneously anti-liberal, anti-Islam campaign. He even attended an EDL demonstration later in 2010 as noted by The Guardian.

Anders Brevik has a college education, with a degree in Business Administration. Despite his high qualification, this man acted on sociopathic tendencies and his deranged ideology to attack and kill 76 people whilst injuring 96 others with guns and bombs.
Article Box

Article Box
In Norway, a man with a degree in Business Administration had to be a lone and brutally efficient gunman, carrying out his own massacre. But in Pakistan a man with a plan like that of Anders Brevik (a desi Muslim living inside Pakistan, with his middling qualifications and middle class background) would have found no dearth of terrorist organisations willing to accept him. He would easily have been accommodated into some third-tier position in Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, Sipah-e-Sahaba or the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan. There would be no lack of experienced gunmen for this trained manager of men to command. That is the difference between Norway and Pakistan. Whereas their right-wing extremists have to plot, fund and plan on the fringes of their society, slipping across borders for ideological support, in Pakistan if one has mad plans to exterminate an entire segment of the population one will find many takers and followers in a jiffy.

In Norway, a man with a degree in Business Administration had to be a lone and brutally efficient gunman, carrying out his own massacre. But in Pakistan a man with a plan like that of Anders Brevik would have found no dearth of terrorist organisations willing to accept him

In his manifesto, Anders Brevik made a departure from the ideas of the Norwegian right-wing's pre-9/11 attitude, which venerated paganism, held up the Vikings and decried the "softening" influence Christianity had on Norwegian society. This complaint about Norway becoming less militaristic and more pacifist could be found in the 90s among the followers of the Norwegian Black Metal scene, where openly racist metallists like Euronymous of Mayhem and Varg Vikernes of Burzum spouted theories of neo-paganism and racial purity. However, this was no gimmick or joke, as Varg Vikernes ended up killing Euronymous in a fight and serving a prison sentence. Another member of Mayhem had a bloody end: drummer Per "Dead" Ohlin committed suicide with a shotgun two years before bandmate Euronymous's death. Compare these outcomes with what has happened to two of Pakistan's musical icons of the 90s who succumbed to conservative ideologies: Junaid Jamshaid of Vital Sings forswore music to become a Tableeghi, while Ali Azmat of Junoon became a mouthpiece for conspiracy theories peddled by the military establishment of Pakistan. These are cultural reflections of ideological misanthropies, to be sure. But the difference is that the politically powerful of Norway made sure that it remained on the fringes of their society. Their media, parliament and legal system have so far prevented the mania of the far-right from shaping public opinion.

This is why Anders Brevik had to go to London to find support for his Crusades-oriented "revolt" against his own culture's laxity. Brevik harked back to the Knights Templars' who fought the Muslims in the Crusades, and not the vikings of pre-Christian Norway. This was a sort of Christian reflection of Al Qaeda's call for jihad against Westerners in the Middle East. The Daily Mail quoted Thomas Heghammer, a terror expert from the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, who said that the manifesto bears a resemblance to those of Osama Bin Ladin, although from the standpoint of a Christian.

In the end, like Osama Bin Ladin, Anders Brevik seems to have killed more of his own co-religionists and fellow race-members, than any of his (perceived) enemy targets. According to his own chauvinistic ideology, he had found his co-religionists and native Norwegians not sufficiently adhering to their own culture and religion. Rather like Al-Qaeda and its friends in Pakistan, isn't it?

TLW blogs at http://theselongwars.blogspot.com and can be followed on http://twitter.com/theselongwars
 

Comments (3 comments)

Furthermore

- See more at: http://www.thefridaytimes.com/beta2/tft/article.php?issue=20110805&page=23#sthash.FlDb7IxV.dpuf

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